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Child labour in Bangladesh

Child labour in Bangladesh

To abolish child labour you first have to make it visible. Child labour has been forbidden in Bangladesh since 1992. 13 years later I visited a garment factory in Narayanganj, which is the centre of the country's textile industry. I took a picture of the owner beating a 12-year-old boy because he had been too slow sewing T-shirts. The photograph attracted a lot of international attention and made me determined to investigate the issue more fully. According to UNICEF, more than 7.4 million children are engaged in economic activity in Bangladesh. Many of them work in very poor conditions; some even risk their lives.

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Plight of Rohingya Refugee

Plight of Rohingya Refugee

<p>Extreme violence in Myanmar has forced Rohingya families to flee the state. Homes and fields have been set on fire; family members have been killed and the intensity continues. On 25 August 2017, Myanmar’s military and local militia launched a wave of “clearance operations.” This was allegedly in response to attacks by the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army in Rakhine state that turned into widespread violence against civilians. More than 700,000 Rohingya people have fled across the border since August to escape a brutal military crackdown and have poured into Bangladesh. The momentum and scale of arrivals make this the world’s fastest growing refugee crisis.<br></p> <br><p></p>

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Sex workers in Bangladesh

Sex workers in Bangladesh

<p></p><p>The two-to-three –thousand –square-meter area of Kandaportte Potitalow is home to 1500 prostitutes and their families. This place is all they know and it has its own micro infrastructure of grocery stores, teahouses,hairdressers, and doctors. The women themselves only know this other world through the men who come here; they know rickshaw pullers, truckers, businessmen, policemen and priests.</p> <p>&nbsp;Most of the girls who work here were either born here, fled here, or were sold by their relatives when they were between eight and ten years old. Low social status and a lack of opportunities for both education and employment, have forced many Bangladeshi women into prostitution or exposed them to other forms of sexual exploitation. An estimated 150,000 women are involved in prostitution in Bangladesh.<br></p><br><p></p>

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Ships' Graveyard in Pakistan

Ships' Graveyard in Pakistan

<p>The funeral rites for the world's largest ships are read on the beaches of the Indian subcontinent. When a super tanker or a cargo vessel reaches the end of its useful life, it generally limps towards Chittagong in Bangladesh, Alang in India or Gaddani in Pakistan. Piece by piece, it will be taken apart for recycling, its steel taken away to re-rolling mills.<br></p><p> <br> I visited the Gaddani ship-breaking yard north of Karachi. Thousands of men, mostly Pashto migrants, toil over the ships. They are seasonal workers, returning to their homeland near the Afghan border at harvest time. The job is one of the world's most dangerous: workers are at risk from toxic chemicals, asbestos, a complete absence of safety equipment and frequent accidents and explosions.<b></b></p> <br><p></p>

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Mental hospital in Indonesia

Mental hospital in Indonesia

<p>Indonesia has a population of 240 million and only 500 psychiatrists. The resulting treatment gap leads many to rely on traditional herbal treatments and prayer to alleviate mental illness, often thought to be caused by malevolent spirits. Almost 750,000 Indonesians with mental illness get no medical treatment and where they do patients are often kept chained, caged and naked. Indonesia <br></p>

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The Refugee Crisis in Greece

The Refugee Crisis in Greece

<p> Out of the 65 million people displaced globally, an increasing number of migrants and refugees are passing through Greece. Numbers of migrants and refugees have been steadily increasing over the last decade, but in 2016 Greece saw unprecedented numbers of new arrivals. </p><p>I spent a month in Greece documenting Refugees and their children. To closely shoot their life I spent awakening nights in the shore of the Mitilini, waited for boats to arrive and walked 20 km in the Idomeni with refugees while they were trying to cross the border. My experience was eye-opening, sad, scary, and often shocking. </p> <br><p></p>

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Nothing to hold on to

Nothing to hold on to

<p></p><p>Nearly three thousand kilometers of railway track crisscross the delta lowlands of Bangladesh, connecting Dhaka, the capital, with Chittagong to the south-east and Calcutta to the south-west. The system was built largely by the British and began operations in 1862, more than a hundred years before Bangladesh became an independent nation.<br> <br> Bangladeshi trains now carry more than forty million passengers a year in three ticketed classes: air-conditioned, first, and second - and then there are the passengers who can't pay. These riders, many of them daily commuters going to and from work, cling to handles, crouch in doorways, perch on the couplings between cars, and climb onto the roof. I began riding the rails with my camera in 2006. I wanted to draw attention to the danger the stowaways expose themselves to; gruesome accidents are routine for free riders. 'There is nothing to hold on to,'</p><p></p>

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Burning ghats in Varanasi

Burning ghats in Varanasi

<p>The most confronting Ghat, Manikarnika (also known simply as the burning Ghat) is the place where the majority of dead bodies are cremated in Varanasi. <br></p><p><br></p><p>Hindus believe it will liberate them from the cycle of death and rebirth. Indeed, you'll openly come face to face with death at Manikarnika Ghat. Piles of firewood line the shore and the fires continually burn with the stream of dead bodies, each wrapped in cloth and carried through the lanes on makeshift stretchers by the <i>Doms</i>&nbsp;(a caste of untouchables that handles the corpses and supervises the burning Ghat). <br></p><p></p>

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Hell for Leather

Hell for Leather

<p></p><p>Bangladesh's leather industry is worth over $ 1 billion a year and around 20,000 people are employed in the hundreds of tanneries operating along the banks of the Buriganga River in the southwest of Dhaka, the capital. Yet while this industry provides a livelihood for tens of thousands of workers and their families, the working conditions and chemicals used in the tanning process can have devastating effects on the health of the workers and a complete lack of safety and environmental regulations has caused severe pollution of surrounding waterways. Add to this the widespread use of child labour in Bangladesh's tanneries and the whole industry became yet another dangerous and dubious sector of the national economy alongside more infamous sectors like the garment industry.</p> <br><p></p>

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A hidden tribe of Bangladesh

A hidden tribe of Bangladesh

<p></p><p>The Mru people live a very peaceful life, farming organically, using only what is necessary, and living well within their means. The smiling, welcoming faces as well as the extraordinary hospitality of this hidden tribe in Bangladesh, made an ever-lasting impression upon me.</p><p><br></p> <p>The solitary, independent and peace-loving Mru people have lived in the Hill Tract of southeastern Bangladesh and western Burma for centuries – their small population being split almost in half by the border. Many scholars believe them to be the original inhabitants of the region. Mru prefer to live on the remote hilltops; even away from other hill tribes. Their villages are easily distinguished by sacred bamboo totems, presided over by guardian spirits.</p> <br><p></p>

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Home for elderly people in Nepal

Home for elderly people in Nepal

<p>The Pashupati Bridhashram (Home for elderly people) is the largest old home in Katmandu run by the government. There are 230 residents, 140 of them women and 90 of them are man. It has always lack of fund for food. Several old aged homes have been developed in Nepal in recent years to rehabilitate the elderly people for their welfare. <br></p>

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Life on Fire: Victims of Petrol bomb

Life on Fire: Victims of Petrol bomb

<p>Continuous strikes, blockades and extreme violence has turned regular expression and political protests into a campaign of violence upon the general public, forging innocent people into the victims of violent attacks. Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH), Burn Unit doctors said that most of the petrol bomb victims were burnt from 20 percent to 40 percent of their bodies. At least 76 people have been killed and 225 people have been burnt in petrol bomb attacks across the country during political blockade started in January, 2015. <br></p>

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